Small Prince Art

Updates Thursdays

Makeup Post: Homestuck: Equius Zahhak

Reference PicEyes closedEyes open both eyes
Your name is EQUIUS ZAHHAK.

You love being STRONG.

Since Equius is my favorite of the characters I’m doing for this series, I decided to go something very dramatic for this look. I like the way the black fades into the blue, and the angularness of how this turned out.

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Makeup Post: Homestuck: Gamzee Makara

Reference Pic

Eyes closed Eyes open

I really don’t like this character, and probably wouldn’t include him if it weren’t for the completionist in me.

That being said, I think this look suits him in a way. Gamzee is kind of gross and messy and I think the dark shadowing really brings out that side of him.  I also thought the bright purple underneath the eyes brings the look together.

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100 Banned Books: A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

100 Banned Books: A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

What’s It About?
The novel’s protagonist is Alex, a 15 year old living in a near-future dystopian England. He is very intelligent, and loves classical music, almost as much as he loves random ultraviolence.
He and his friends (droogs) spend their days causing as much violence as possible. However, all of Alex’s friends are older than him, and challenge him to try a “man-sized” job: robbing the house of an old cat lady. Angry, Alex lashes out at his friends, and leads them to the old woman’s house to go through with the job. After attacking the old woman and acidently killing her, Alex’s friends betray him and he gets caught by the police.
Once in prison, Alex is recruited into something called The Ludovico experiment, in which he is forced to watch graphically violent movies after getting an injection that makes him ill. This is a type of aversion therapy causes Alex to become extremely nausea whenever witnessing violence, and has the unintended consequence of also him feeling the same kind of nausea whenever he hears classical music. The experience leaves him completely harmless to the rest of the world, but also leaves him completely unable to defend himself from anyone. They then toss him onto the unforgiving streets, where people from his old life remember who he was and are more than happy to take advantage of the new situation.
Why Was It Banned?
In Part 1, the main character of A Clockwork Orange rapes a woman while forcing her husband to watch, and then inadvertally kills her, may have raped two 10 year old girls, sliced up his friends, and attacked an old lady and tried to rob her. This book puts some slasher movies to shame. It doesn’t help that there is a whole lot of cursing in the book, and many of the violent scenes are very graphic. Because of that, it’s been banned from high schools, and apparently a book store owner was arrested for selling the bookA Clockwork Orange.
However, the part of the book that was censored the most was the last chapter. SPOILER ALERT: in the last chapter Alex decides that he is too old for mayhem, implying that his sociopathic tendancies were a product of youth. Some publishers took the last chapter out and ended the book when Alex’s treatment was reversed and he ended up exactly the same as he was when the book started. It was a rare case of altering a book to make it sadder. Burgess hated this change, and always fought against it.
My Thoughts?
This book is really hard to read.
Not because the violence though. The book is written in Alex’s point of view, and he thinks and speaks in a type of slang called Nadsat, which is apparently derived from Russian words. Burgess apparently said once that the reason he wrote in this way is to provide a barrier between him and the terrible things the protagonist is doing. However, opening the book for the first time and seeing what could be considered gibberish can be really daunting for some people. Personally, I really didn’t get used to the language until halfway into Part 2.
But once I could understand what was happening, it got really interesting. Part 1 was kind of frustrating to read because of all the unreadable slang, but Parts 2 and 3 were the best parts of the book anyway. Reading about all the awful things Alex was doing got really old after a while, and the experiment and how it was done and the effects it had was probably the most interesting part of the book anyway.

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Makeup Post: Homestuck: Eridan Ampora

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Eridan_Ampora

“as the prince of hope im uniquely qualified to recognize wwhen all hope is lost”

More Homestuck trash: this time with Eridan Ampora, the douche prince of the sea. I really like this one, it is a lot more wearable than I originally planned, but it’s still really dark and fun with a bright inner eye and a double liner.

Also I’m sure I will one day learn how to take pictures.

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Makeup Post: Homestuck: Feferi Piexes.

390 391Feferi reference pic

So since I’m a big baby Homestuck nerd, I decided to feature the Trolls as my first makeup series.

The first is Feferi Piexes, the super friendly, bubbly, fuchsia mermaid princess.  Since she’s much less intense and much nicer than many of the other trolls are, there’s much less grey and black than any other design in the series. There’s only a little grey in the crease to add a little bit of contour.  Other than that, it’s just a bright pink lid with the colors of the skirt as the eyeliner, which I think turned out pretty well.

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Announcement

This probably wouldn’t be a surprise to anyone, but I need to put this blog on an official hiatus.  I’ve had many medical problems in the past year that made posting difficult, and I need time to get some projects straight and done and prepare for the Fall semester.

The hiatus probably won’t be that long, I’m going to Dragoncon over Labor Day weekend and I’m hoping to start posting again not long after that.   I will most likely try to keep the posts to once a week, on Thursdays, until I feel like I have a decent enough backlog to start posting more often.  My end goal is to be able to post things every day Monday through Friday.

Also, I’ve decided to expand what will be on the blog. Yes, reviewing is great and I love doing it, but I also want to start posting my own art on this blog!  I’m also planning on changing some other aspects of the blog, such as the layout and possibly the name.

If you want to know what I’m doing until I start posting again, you can follow me on my personal blog: http://raritysparklepants.tumblr.com/ or my new art blog, which would kind of a preview of things to come, : smallprinceart.tumblr.com

 

Thank you!

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The Mortal Instruments Book 6: City of Heavenly Fire

City of heavently fire    The Mortal Instruments Book 6: City of Heavenly Fire

                                              

City of Heavenly Fire is the sixth and final book in The Mortal Instruments series, along with City of Bones, City of Ashes, City of Glass, City of Fallen Angels, and City of Lost Souls. It is set in Cassandra Clare’s Shadowhunter universe, along with The Infernal Devices series.

The Mortal Instruments was originally a trilogy consisting of City of Bones, City of Ashes, and City of Glass. It was later expanded into a sextet once Clare decided to expand the Shadowhunter world into several trilogies. The Infernal Devices is a spin off trilogy set in the 1800s and ties into The Mortal Instruments at times.

There are also two more upcoming spin off trilogies: The Dark Artifices, consisting of Lady Midnight (which comes out Fall 2015), The Prince of Shadows, and The Queen of Air and Darkness, and, The Last Hours trilogy, consisting of Chain of Thorns, Chain of Gold, and Chain of Iron, which will publish as a tie in series with The Dark Artifices. The publish order is as follows:

DA: Lady Midnight (Fall 2015)

LH: Chain of Thorns

DA: The Prince of Shadows

LH: Chain of Gold

DA: The Queen of Air and Darkness

LH: Chain of Iron

When I was looking around the website, I found something called The Secret Treasons, which looks like it might be another book or trilogy, but I didn’t find any other information about it other than the name.

There are also three companion books: one of which is a companion guide to the Shadowhunter world: The Shadowhunter Codex, which came out in 2013. There is also Shadowhunters and Downworlders: A Mortal Instruments Guide, which contains essays written by several other prominent YA authors, including Holly Black (one of the writers of the Spiderwick Chronicles and the author the Modern Tales of Faerie series, which has been featured on this blog), Rachel Caine (author of The Morgansville Vampires series), and Kami Garcia (author of the Beautiful Creatures series).

Also, there is a series of short stories written by Cassandra Clare and some of her writer friends available on eBook called The Bane Chronicles. This series stars one of the most popular character in the series, Magnus Bane. A printed collection of the stories will hit be available this November, and will be featured on this blog.

Finally, Clare and her friend she has co-written before, Holly Black, known best for The Spiderwick Chronicles, are working on another set of books, The Magisterium Series, the first of which comes out September 9th, 2014. I haven’t decided if I’m going to review it yet, but I am at least going to take a look at it.

 

The book opens with the introduction of the major players of The Dark Artifices series, Emma Carstairs and Jules Blackthorn, who are currently about 12 years old. They live with their parents at the Los Angeles Institute when they get attacked by Sebastian Morganstern and his army of Dark Shadowhunters. Emma and Jules escape with Jules younger siblings, but their parents are killed and Jules’ half-fae older brother gets taken by the Wild Hunt, a group of faeries that exist outside the Courts.

This is one of the first of Sebastian Morganstern’s, the main bad guy of this part of the series and the protagonist’s evil older brother, attacks on the Nephilim (also called Shadowhunters). He completely decimates the Institutes, and anyone he doesn’t kill is forced to join his army of Dark Shadowhunters, who fights with infernal magic instead of divine magic like normal Shadowhunters. It is also very clear that he has very powerful demons on his side

Not only that, but Sebastian has also started to attack any Downworlder (fae, werewolves, vampires, and warlocks allies of the Shadowhunters, which starts to damage the already turmulous peace between the Downworlders and the Shadowhunters, as some Downworlders are starting to think that siding against the Nephilim may be best for them.

Shortly after one of his attacks, Sebastian Morganstern gives the Shadowhunter Clave a message: he will stop the attacks against them, if they hand over Clary and her boyfriend, Jace Lightwood, who was raised by Sebastian and Clary’s birth father, Valentine, who was the main villain in the first trilogy, over to him.

The Clave isn’t inclined to sacrificed their non-adult members to sociopaths, which means that it’s up to Clary, Jace, and their friends to figure out how to defeat Sebastian before he completely obliterates their people.

In the sixth and final installment of The Mortal Instruments series, the beloved characters must travel to the most unlikeliest of places, face dangerous foes, and most terrifyingly of all, talk to each other about their feelings. Long time readers will not want to miss this dynamite ending to a pretty good urban fantasy.

 

This is probably Clare’s best to date. There were many twists and turns, and the ending felt much more satisfying than the original ending in City of Glass. We got closure for many of the beloved characters of the series, particularly Alec Lightwood and Magnus Bane. City of Glass ended with Alec finally coming to terms with his sexuality and his relationship with Magnus Bane, which was a great ending for his story arc, but his character and their relationship is much more fleshed out in the second story arc and deals with the downsides of falling in love with someone who is immortal.

Also, Isabelle Lightwood’s, Alec’s younger sister, is much more fleshed out in the second arc. For most of the first arc, she was pretty much a decent supporting character, and was very much in the background. In the more recent books her relationship with Simon has been a major plot line, along with her dealing with some of the emotional baggage brought on by her parent’s dissolving relationship and the death of her younger brother by the hands of Sebastian.

All in all, it was a very good end to a very good series. To be honest, the first trilogy can be cringe worthy at times, but the second trilogy is really where the good points shine through. You probably could read the second trilogy on its own, though you would miss the introductions to many of the major players of the series and the world the series takes place. Also, you technically don’t have to read The Infernal Devices to keep up with the plot, though I do recommend it since there are some characters crossover from one series to the other.

One thing City of Heavenly Fire did that the books before it did not was integrate the characters of the next story arc fully into the current story arc. Emma and Jules, the main characters of The Dark Artifices

Rating: 9 out of 10.

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The Infernal Devices Book 3: Clockwork Princess by Cassandra Clare

Image     The Infernal Devices Book 3: Clockwork Princess by Cassandra Clare

 

Clockwork Princess is the third book in The Infernal Devices trilogy, along with Clockwork Angel and Clockwork Prince. It is the second trilogy set in Cassandra Clare’s Shadowhunter universe, along with The Mortal Instruments series.

The Mortal Instruments was originally a trilogy consisting of City of Bones, City of Ashes, and City of Glass. However, it was later expanded into a sextet, with City of Fallen Angels, City of Lost Souls, and City of Heavenly Fire, which came out a few weeks ago (and since I finally saved up enough money to buy it, the review for it will hopefully come out next week).

There are also two more upcoming spin off trilogies: The Dark Artifices, consisting of Lady Midnight (which comes out Fall 2015), The Prince of Shadows, and The Queen of Air and Darkness, and, The Last Hours trilogy, consisting of Chain of Thorns, Chain of Gold, and Chain of Iron, which will come out sometime in the next few years.

When I was looking around the website, I found something called The Secret Treasons, which looks like it might be another book or trilogy, but I didn’t find any other information about it other than the name.

There are also three companion books: one of which is a companion guide to the Shadowhunter world: The Shadowhunter Codex, which came out in 2013. There is also Shadowhunters and Downworlders: A Mortal Instruments Guide, which contains essays written by several other prominent YA authors, including Holly Black (one of the writers of the Spiderwick Chronicles and the author the Modern Tales of Faerie series, which has been featured on this blog), Rachel Caine (author of The Morgansville Vampires series), and Kami Garcia (author of the Beautiful Creatures series).

Also, there is a series of short stories written by Cassandra Clare and some of her writer friends available on eBook called The Bane Chronicles. This series stars one of the most popular character in the series, Magnus Bane. A printed collection of the stories will hit be available this November, and will be featured on this blog.

Finally, Clare and her friend she has co-written before, Holly Black, known best for The Spiderwick Chronicles, are working on another set of books, The Magisterium Series, the first of which comes out September 9th, 2014. I haven’t decided if I’m going to review it yet, but I am at least going to take a look at it.

 

Sometimes I forget how much content this series has and will have in the future until I have to write that page and a half long essay on all the different books that are out and will come out. I do this thing sometimes where I just find and author and decide to just read everything that person has written (for example: Darren Shan and his those two massive series from him I read last year).   As you can see, Cassandra Clare has become one of these authors.

 

Anyway, Clockwork Princess starts off two months after the end of Clockwork Prince, which is also two months after Jem Carstairs, a terminally ill Shadowhunter, proposed to Tessa Gray, a young warlock with the amazing power to shape shift into whoever she wants. It is also two months since Jem’s best friend Will Herondale, also professed his love for Tessa, two months since the warlock Magnus Bane helped him discover that the curse that was placed upon him when he was twelve turned out to be fake, and two months after his younger sister, Cecily, traveled to London to convince her brother to return home to Wales.

In the two months that have passed, Tessa has begun to prepare for her wedding, Will has reluctantly begun his sister’s training ,and Gideon Lightwood, who came to live at the London Institute after having enough of his father’s demonic antics, is trying to figure out exactly what he did wrong that made Sophie, a maid with the Sight, suddenly reject all of his advances.

Unfortunately, their momentarily quiet existence is disturbed when Gabriel Lightwood, Gideon’s younger brother runs to the Institute when his father inexplicably turns into a demon. When the Shadowhunters of the Institute go to fight the monster, they find clues about the whereabouts of Mortmain, a mundane with a grudge on the Shadowhunters for murdering his adoptive warlock parents.

With the new information in hand, the group tries to go after Mortmain, but are hit with resistance as the Consul, leader of Shadowhunter Council, has had enough of Charlotte Branwell, leader of the London Institute, and her independence and reluctance to blindly follow everything he says. Seemingly on their own, Tessa and her friends must try and defeat Mortmain before he uses his clockwork abominations to destroy Shadowhunter life as we know it.

 

Oh my goodness, this was quite a book. I love The Infernal Devices series, I really do. This was such an enjoyable book, I had just so much fun reading it! That’s what really reading should be about: enjoyment.

More specifically, the storyline of Charlotte Branwell and her fight to keep the London Institute. At every turn her word is rejected by the Consul and other Shadowhunters because she was a woman, and her fight to keep this Institute open for the orphaned teens who live there is impressive to say the least. Charlotte shows that she is a compassionate and stern woman, and her story is one of the best parts of the series.

Also, normally the love triangles make me cringe, but the Jem-Tessa-Will storyline was actually fairly well done. Both boys were very respectful of the other and Tessa’s decisions, and I think that helped me stay interested. It was clear that Jem and Will clearly had a brotherly love for each other, their relationship was not going to suffer because they both fell in love with the same girl, even one as unique as Tessa Gray.

 

As I said earlier, I really love this series, and Clockwork Princess was a good end to a good series. Granted, the end does feel like it just… keeps… going, but other than that it was a solid read.

 

Rating: 8 out 10.

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The Infernal Devices Series: The Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare

The Clockwork Prince   The Infernal Devices Series: The Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare

 

The Clockwork Prince is the second book in The Infernal Devices trilogy, along with The Clockwork Angel and The Clockwork Princess, which came out last year. It is the second trilogy set in Cassandra Clare’s Shadowhunter universe, also featured in The Mortal Instruments series.

The Mortal Instruments was originally a trilogy consisting of City of Bones, City of Ashes, and City of Glass. However, it was later expanded into a sextet, with City of Fallen Angels, City of Lost Souls, and City of Heavenly Fire, which is currently out to the public. (Note: Since I don’t have a lot of money right now, I haven’t been able to buy it and read it.)

There are also two more upcoming spin off trilogies: The Dark Artifices, consisting of Lady Midnight (which comes out in 2015), The Prince of Shadows, and The Queen of Air and Darkness, and, finally, The Last Hours series, which will come out sometime in the next few years.

There are also three companion books: one of which is a companion guide to the Shadowhunter world: The Shadowhunter Codex, which came out in 2013. There is also Shadowhunters and Downworlders: A Mortal Instruments Guide, which contains essays written by several other prominent YA authors, including Holly Black (one of the writers of the The Spiderwick Chronicles and the author the Modern Tales of Faerie series, which has been featured on this blog), Rachel Caine (author of The Morgansville Vampires series), and Kami Garcia (author of the Beautiful Creatures series).

Finally, there is a series of short stories available on ebook called The Bane Chronicles. This series stars one of the most popular character in the series, Magnus Bane. A printed collection of the stories will hit be available this November.

 

The Clockwork Angel ended on a cliffhanger, in which Will Herondale, a surly and secretive, young Shadowhunter, showing up at Magnus Bane’s door, asking for help. The Clockwork Prince opens with Will picking up supplies for whatever Magnus agreed to do for him, which seems to involve summoning demons.

Later he meets up with his best friend, Jem Carstairs, and Tessa Gray, a young woman who has the ability to change into anyone she wants to, to the Clave meeting.

After the events of the last book, Charlotte Branwell, the young lady who runs the London Institute, is being placed under judgement by the Counsel of Shadowhunters. However, Benedict Lightwood interrupts to challenge Charlotte for the position of the head of the Institute. Basically, if she and her charges do not find a good lead on the wearabouts of Mortmain, a mundane with a specific grudge on Shadowhunters, and who tricked Charlotte into trusting him in The Clockwork Angel, in the next two weeks, the London Institute gets handed over to the Lightwoods.

Additionally, the Council demanded that Tessa and Sophie, a maid with the Sight, should be trained to fight by Lightwood’s two sons, Gideon and Gabriel, in case of another attack by Mortmain.

After that, it’s a race against the clock to try and find Mortmain. Tensions are high and Tessa struggles with the mystery of who she is and the betrayal of her brother, Nate. With many twists and turns, and even more automatons, we learn much more about the politics involved with the Shadowhunter world.

 

Shadowhunter families are typically very old, and tend to branch gernerations. Because of that, one of the fun parts of reading this series after The Mortal Instruments is seeing the different families over the years. For example, some of the main antagonists is the Lightwood family, who are some of the main protagonists in The Mortal Instruments. Every once in a while a name will pop up that and I’ll go “ohh h hey that’s so and so’s ancestor”.

Also, this series has a more interesting villain than the first half of The Mortal Instruments series. Valentine was your basic super racist, tyranical villain who fully believed that his genocidal intentions were the best way to go about saving the world. While those are perfectly fine, there’s just something about a villain that seems to always be a few steps ahead of the heroes, whose so sneaky and so manipulative, that you have no idea what he’s going to do next.

That really is the difference between The Mortal Instruments and The Infernal Devices is that for the most part, the first half of The Mortal Instruments who were fairly predictable, which made them really good guilty pleasure books, but nothing really special. The Infernal Devices, on the other hand, is just a pretty good mystery. The world is fun, the story is good, and the characters are fairly likable. I am a big fan of these books, and am excited about reading the last book.

 

Rating: 8 out of 10.

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The Infernal Devices Book 1: The Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare

The Clockwork Angel   The Infernal Devices Book 1: The Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare

 

The Clockwork Angel is the first book in The Infernal Devices trilogy, followed by The Clockwork Prince and The Clockwork Princess, which came out last year. It is the second trilogy set in Cassandra Clare’s Shadowhunter universe, the first being The Mortal Instruments series.

The Mortal Instruments was originally a trilogy consisting of City of Bones, City of Ashes, and City of Glass. However, it was later expanded into a sextet, with City of Fallen Angels, City of Lost Souls, and City of Heavenly Fire, which comes out later this month.

There are also two more upcoming spin off trilogies: The Dark Artifices, consisting of Lady Midnight (which comes out in 2015), The Prince of Shadows, and The Queen of Air and Darkness, and, finally, The Last Hours series, which will come out sometime in the next few years.

There are also three companion books: one of which is a companion guide to the Shadowhunter world: The Shadowhunter Codex, which came out in 2013. There is also Shadowhunters and Downworlders: A Mortal Instruments Guide, which contains essays written by several other prominent YA authors, including Holly Black (one of the writers of the The Spiderwick Chronicles and the author the Modern Tales of Faerie series, which has been featured on this blog), Rachel Caine (author of The Morgansville Vampires series), and Kami Garcia (author of the Beautiful Creatures series).

Finally, there is a series of short stories available on ebook called The Bane Chronicles. This series stars one of the most popular character in the series, Magnus Bane. A printed collection of the stories will hit be available this November.

 

The Clockwork Angel takes place in19th century London, and the main protagonist, the orphaned Tessa Gray, just came off the boat from New York to meet her brother Nathan. However, it appears that Nathan has sent two friends to pick her up, the mysterious Dark Sisters.

Though at first the Dark Sisters seem nice, Tessa quickly finds out that they are less interested in her well being, and more interested in forcing Tessa to her formerly dormant power to shapeshift for their own gains. After weeks in the care of the Dark Sisters, Tessa is rescued by a group of Shadowhunters.

She is brought to the London Institute, which is run by Charlotte Branwell, and her inventor husband, Henry Branwell. Tessa also meets Will Herondale, young man who seems to strive to alienate all those around him, Will’s best friend Jem Carstairs, a very calm and quiet young man, and Jessamine Lovelace, a girl of Shadowhunter blood who really doesn’t want to be a Shadowhunter.

With the help of her new friends, Tessa solves the mystery of her brother’s dissaperence and its relevance to the mysterious Pandemonium Club. The story is filled with twists and turns, and Tessa finds out more about herself and the Shadow World around her.

 

The Clockwork Angel is the first book Clare wrote after the end of the first half of The Mortal Instruments sextet, and Clare’s writing growth is evident. The characters have more depth, the backgrounds and visuals are… simple, and the main mystery is much more interesting.

This series takes place right after the Accords, a series of treaties between the Shadowhunters and the Downworlders (vampires, werewolves, warlocks, and faeries) that keeps the two sides from going after each other. The deal is if the Downworlders don’t go around killing regular humans, then the Shadowhunters can’t kill Downworlders for no reason. A big part of the book is seeing how both sides react to the Accords, as there are Downworlders who find living under the close watch of the Shadowhunters distasteful at best, and the Shadowhunters who just can’t seem to consider the other side actual people.

There are also mentions of the place of women in Shadowhunter society, particularly when the story focuses on Charlotte, who’s status as the caretaker of the London Institute is constantly under question as the older and often male Shadowhunters would rather listen to her husband. It’s also addressed with Jessamine, who was brought up to think a lady behaves in a certain way and would do anything to get away from the dangerous and often bloody life of the Shadowhunters.

I thought this book was fantastic, and for those that might be uncomfortable with some of the plotlines in The Mortal Instruments might have a better time with The Infernal Devices. Also: Steampunk. There’s a whole lot of steampunk, and it’s pretty fantastic.

 

Rating: 8 of 10.

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