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The Infernal Devices Book 3: Clockwork Princess by Cassandra Clare

Image     The Infernal Devices Book 3: Clockwork Princess by Cassandra Clare

 

Clockwork Princess is the third book in The Infernal Devices trilogy, along with Clockwork Angel and Clockwork Prince. It is the second trilogy set in Cassandra Clare’s Shadowhunter universe, along with The Mortal Instruments series.

The Mortal Instruments was originally a trilogy consisting of City of Bones, City of Ashes, and City of Glass. However, it was later expanded into a sextet, with City of Fallen Angels, City of Lost Souls, and City of Heavenly Fire, which came out a few weeks ago (and since I finally saved up enough money to buy it, the review for it will hopefully come out next week).

There are also two more upcoming spin off trilogies: The Dark Artifices, consisting of Lady Midnight (which comes out Fall 2015), The Prince of Shadows, and The Queen of Air and Darkness, and, The Last Hours trilogy, consisting of Chain of Thorns, Chain of Gold, and Chain of Iron, which will come out sometime in the next few years.

When I was looking around the website, I found something called The Secret Treasons, which looks like it might be another book or trilogy, but I didn’t find any other information about it other than the name.

There are also three companion books: one of which is a companion guide to the Shadowhunter world: The Shadowhunter Codex, which came out in 2013. There is also Shadowhunters and Downworlders: A Mortal Instruments Guide, which contains essays written by several other prominent YA authors, including Holly Black (one of the writers of the Spiderwick Chronicles and the author the Modern Tales of Faerie series, which has been featured on this blog), Rachel Caine (author of The Morgansville Vampires series), and Kami Garcia (author of the Beautiful Creatures series).

Also, there is a series of short stories written by Cassandra Clare and some of her writer friends available on eBook called The Bane Chronicles. This series stars one of the most popular character in the series, Magnus Bane. A printed collection of the stories will hit be available this November, and will be featured on this blog.

Finally, Clare and her friend she has co-written before, Holly Black, known best for The Spiderwick Chronicles, are working on another set of books, The Magisterium Series, the first of which comes out September 9th, 2014. I haven’t decided if I’m going to review it yet, but I am at least going to take a look at it.

 

Sometimes I forget how much content this series has and will have in the future until I have to write that page and a half long essay on all the different books that are out and will come out. I do this thing sometimes where I just find and author and decide to just read everything that person has written (for example: Darren Shan and his those two massive series from him I read last year).   As you can see, Cassandra Clare has become one of these authors.

 

Anyway, Clockwork Princess starts off two months after the end of Clockwork Prince, which is also two months after Jem Carstairs, a terminally ill Shadowhunter, proposed to Tessa Gray, a young warlock with the amazing power to shape shift into whoever she wants. It is also two months since Jem’s best friend Will Herondale, also professed his love for Tessa, two months since the warlock Magnus Bane helped him discover that the curse that was placed upon him when he was twelve turned out to be fake, and two months after his younger sister, Cecily, traveled to London to convince her brother to return home to Wales.

In the two months that have passed, Tessa has begun to prepare for her wedding, Will has reluctantly begun his sister’s training ,and Gideon Lightwood, who came to live at the London Institute after having enough of his father’s demonic antics, is trying to figure out exactly what he did wrong that made Sophie, a maid with the Sight, suddenly reject all of his advances.

Unfortunately, their momentarily quiet existence is disturbed when Gabriel Lightwood, Gideon’s younger brother runs to the Institute when his father inexplicably turns into a demon. When the Shadowhunters of the Institute go to fight the monster, they find clues about the whereabouts of Mortmain, a mundane with a grudge on the Shadowhunters for murdering his adoptive warlock parents.

With the new information in hand, the group tries to go after Mortmain, but are hit with resistance as the Consul, leader of Shadowhunter Council, has had enough of Charlotte Branwell, leader of the London Institute, and her independence and reluctance to blindly follow everything he says. Seemingly on their own, Tessa and her friends must try and defeat Mortmain before he uses his clockwork abominations to destroy Shadowhunter life as we know it.

 

Oh my goodness, this was quite a book. I love The Infernal Devices series, I really do. This was such an enjoyable book, I had just so much fun reading it! That’s what really reading should be about: enjoyment.

More specifically, the storyline of Charlotte Branwell and her fight to keep the London Institute. At every turn her word is rejected by the Consul and other Shadowhunters because she was a woman, and her fight to keep this Institute open for the orphaned teens who live there is impressive to say the least. Charlotte shows that she is a compassionate and stern woman, and her story is one of the best parts of the series.

Also, normally the love triangles make me cringe, but the Jem-Tessa-Will storyline was actually fairly well done. Both boys were very respectful of the other and Tessa’s decisions, and I think that helped me stay interested. It was clear that Jem and Will clearly had a brotherly love for each other, their relationship was not going to suffer because they both fell in love with the same girl, even one as unique as Tessa Gray.

 

As I said earlier, I really love this series, and Clockwork Princess was a good end to a good series. Granted, the end does feel like it just… keeps… going, but other than that it was a solid read.

 

Rating: 8 out 10.

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The Infernal Devices Series: The Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare

The Clockwork Prince   The Infernal Devices Series: The Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare

 

The Clockwork Prince is the second book in The Infernal Devices trilogy, along with The Clockwork Angel and The Clockwork Princess, which came out last year. It is the second trilogy set in Cassandra Clare’s Shadowhunter universe, also featured in The Mortal Instruments series.

The Mortal Instruments was originally a trilogy consisting of City of Bones, City of Ashes, and City of Glass. However, it was later expanded into a sextet, with City of Fallen Angels, City of Lost Souls, and City of Heavenly Fire, which is currently out to the public. (Note: Since I don’t have a lot of money right now, I haven’t been able to buy it and read it.)

There are also two more upcoming spin off trilogies: The Dark Artifices, consisting of Lady Midnight (which comes out in 2015), The Prince of Shadows, and The Queen of Air and Darkness, and, finally, The Last Hours series, which will come out sometime in the next few years.

There are also three companion books: one of which is a companion guide to the Shadowhunter world: The Shadowhunter Codex, which came out in 2013. There is also Shadowhunters and Downworlders: A Mortal Instruments Guide, which contains essays written by several other prominent YA authors, including Holly Black (one of the writers of the The Spiderwick Chronicles and the author the Modern Tales of Faerie series, which has been featured on this blog), Rachel Caine (author of The Morgansville Vampires series), and Kami Garcia (author of the Beautiful Creatures series).

Finally, there is a series of short stories available on ebook called The Bane Chronicles. This series stars one of the most popular character in the series, Magnus Bane. A printed collection of the stories will hit be available this November.

 

The Clockwork Angel ended on a cliffhanger, in which Will Herondale, a surly and secretive, young Shadowhunter, showing up at Magnus Bane’s door, asking for help. The Clockwork Prince opens with Will picking up supplies for whatever Magnus agreed to do for him, which seems to involve summoning demons.

Later he meets up with his best friend, Jem Carstairs, and Tessa Gray, a young woman who has the ability to change into anyone she wants to, to the Clave meeting.

After the events of the last book, Charlotte Branwell, the young lady who runs the London Institute, is being placed under judgement by the Counsel of Shadowhunters. However, Benedict Lightwood interrupts to challenge Charlotte for the position of the head of the Institute. Basically, if she and her charges do not find a good lead on the wearabouts of Mortmain, a mundane with a specific grudge on Shadowhunters, and who tricked Charlotte into trusting him in The Clockwork Angel, in the next two weeks, the London Institute gets handed over to the Lightwoods.

Additionally, the Council demanded that Tessa and Sophie, a maid with the Sight, should be trained to fight by Lightwood’s two sons, Gideon and Gabriel, in case of another attack by Mortmain.

After that, it’s a race against the clock to try and find Mortmain. Tensions are high and Tessa struggles with the mystery of who she is and the betrayal of her brother, Nate. With many twists and turns, and even more automatons, we learn much more about the politics involved with the Shadowhunter world.

 

Shadowhunter families are typically very old, and tend to branch gernerations. Because of that, one of the fun parts of reading this series after The Mortal Instruments is seeing the different families over the years. For example, some of the main antagonists is the Lightwood family, who are some of the main protagonists in The Mortal Instruments. Every once in a while a name will pop up that and I’ll go “ohh h hey that’s so and so’s ancestor”.

Also, this series has a more interesting villain than the first half of The Mortal Instruments series. Valentine was your basic super racist, tyranical villain who fully believed that his genocidal intentions were the best way to go about saving the world. While those are perfectly fine, there’s just something about a villain that seems to always be a few steps ahead of the heroes, whose so sneaky and so manipulative, that you have no idea what he’s going to do next.

That really is the difference between The Mortal Instruments and The Infernal Devices is that for the most part, the first half of The Mortal Instruments who were fairly predictable, which made them really good guilty pleasure books, but nothing really special. The Infernal Devices, on the other hand, is just a pretty good mystery. The world is fun, the story is good, and the characters are fairly likable. I am a big fan of these books, and am excited about reading the last book.

 

Rating: 8 out of 10.

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